What is SETI@home?

SETI@home is a scientific experiment, based at UC Berkeley, that uses Internet-connected computers in the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI). You can participate by running a free program that downloads and analyzes radio telescope data.

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User of the Day

User profile Profile liprman
Hi, I am from Germany and 42 years old, my hobbies are computer, CB-Radio with Packet Radio and many other things..

News

Science progress reports
We're moving closer to completing the analysis of our 18 years of Arecibo data. Recent work has given us a good handle on RFI removal. See the Nebula blog for details.
10 Mar 2017, 8:15:57 UTC · Discuss


New SETI@home donation project on Bitcoin Utopia
We've started a new mining effort on Bitcoin Utopia. If you've got mining equipment and want to help out, please join the effort.

The ~5 bitcoins that were donated last year went primarily to buying replacement hard drives. With the number of drives we have running we lose quite a few over the course of a year. It was nice not to need to dip into cash to replace them.
7 Jan 2017, 0:35:08 UTC · Discuss


Problems with centurion
We're having some problems with centurion, the computer holds the Breakthrough Listen data and does our Breakthrough Listen splitting. Correction will probably require an OS upgrade.

Because of this GBT data will be scarce over the weekend.
6 Jan 2017, 20:25:26 UTC · Discuss


New Nebula blog
A new blog documents the progress and status of Nebula, the SETI@home back end.
2 Dec 2016, 8:12:59 UTC · Discuss


Web site upgrade
We changed the SETI@home web site to use Twitter Bootstrap, a CSS toolkit. This makes the site usable on small displays, and lets us use color schemes developed by other people (this one is called Darkly).
25 Nov 2016, 21:43:52 UTC · Discuss


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SETI@home and Astropulse are funded by grants from the National Science Foundation, NASA, and donations from SETI@home volunteers. AstroPulse is funded in part by the NSF through grant AST-0307956.